Elm-watch 1.1.0 released!

:tada: I just released elm-watch 1.1.0, with a bunch of edge case fixes and a couple of new features! :tada:

  • The biggest feature is the opt-in error overlay in the browser, with clickable error locations!
  • You can now move the browser UI to a different corner.

I go through those two features in more detail in this video:

Full changelog:

Note: If you use elm-watch together with run-pty, make sure to update run-pty to 4.0.2 or later!

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These are all really cool and useful features! Amazing job!

Loved the intro to the video as well :smile:

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Well done! These are great additions. Excited to see the next update. :wink:

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Great video about a great tool. There is only one thing holding me back from moving from elm-live to elm-watch and that is the proxy functionality to reach the back-end. I know you do not want to extend elm-watch with all kind of none-core functionalities. But do you know a good tool to setup a proxy to the back-end that could work alongside elm-watch?

Personally, I donโ€™t use a tool for proxying โ€“ I write a little bit of Node.js code to have full control. You can see that in the example dev server.

Specifically, here is a function for proxying a backend (you could simplify it to always go to 127.0.0.1 but to a certain port):

I recently copied that example and reduced it to just one app when I needed it for a project:

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Thanks for your extensive reply. I highly appreciate it. I will move to elm-watch

Just wanted to say elm-watch is really exellent, thanks for making it. :clap:

We already have a build that runs in a loop using webpack to make the dev/prod builds. However, even with that running I will typically run elm-watch alongside, like this npx elm-watch hot. As I code the Elm side, I tend to look at the output of that over our proper build, since it is very fast and easier to read.

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